Immigration regulation worthy of your attention

There has been a flurry of legislative activity regarding immigration policy in the last few months. Here are summaries of some of the more important bills introduced this spring:

H.R. 1741: Secure Visas Act (5/25/2011). Legislation would give the Secretary of Homeland Security exclusive authority to issue regulations, establish policy, and administer and enforce the provisions of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101 et seq.) and all other immigration or nationality laws relating to the functions of consular officers of the United States in connection with the granting and refusal of a visa. See the full text here.

.  .  .

H.R. 1933 (5/23/2011). Amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to modify the requirements for admission of nonimmigrant nurses in health professional shortage areas.

Section 1. Requirements for admission of nonimmigrant nurses in health professional shortage areas.

(a) Extension of Period of Authorized Admission – Section 212(m)(3) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1182(m)(3)) is amended to read as follows:

(3) The initial period of authorized admission as a nonimmigrant under section 101(a)(15)(H)(i)(c) shall be 3 years, and may be extended once for an additional three-year period…

(b) Number of Visas- Section 212(m)(4) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1182(m)(4)) is amended by striking .500 and inserting .300 …

See the full text here.

.  .  .

H.R. 1842: Dream Act of 2011 (5/11/2011). Authorizes the Secretary of Homeland Security (DHS) to cancel the removal of, and adjust to the status of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence on a conditional basis, an alien who: (1) entered the United States on or before his or her 15th birthday and has been present in the United States for at least five years immediately preceding this Act’s enactment, (2) is a person of good moral character, (3) is not inadmissible under specified grounds of the Immigration and Nationality Act, (4) has been admitted to an institution of higher education (IHE) in the United States or has earned a high school diploma or general education development certificate in the United States, and (5) was age 32 or younger on the date of this Act’s enactment. See the full text here.

.  .  .

H.R. 1796: Reuniting Families Act (5/6/2011). Comprehensive legislation amends the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) to establish the fiscal year worldwide level of employment-based immigrants at 140,000 plus: (1) the previous year’s unused visas, and (2) the number of unused visas from FY1992-FY2011. Establishes the fiscal year worldwide level of family-sponsored immigrants at 480,000 plus: (1) the previous year’s unused visas, and (2) the number of unused visas from FY1992-FY2011. The proposed changes are extensive, and you can view the complete summary here.

.  .  .

H.R. 1764 (5/5/2011). Legislation prohibits the use of community oriented policing services funds in contravention of provisions of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 that restrict a government entity or official from preventing any government entity or official from sending to, or receiving from, the responsible federal immigration agency information regarding an individual’s citizenship or immigration status. See the full text here.

.  .  .

H.R.1698: 10k Run for the Border Act (5/3/2011). “Amends the Immigration and Nationality Act to greatly increase penalties for employing illegal aliens.” The bill was referred to the Subcommittee on Immigration Policy and Enforcement on June 1. In brief, the bill includes the following proposed changes:

Section 274A(e)(4)(A) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1324a(e)(4)(A)) is amended as follows:

(1) in clause (i), by striking ‘$250 and not more than $2,000′ and inserting ‘$10,000 and not more than $80,000′;

(2) in clause (ii), by striking ‘$2,000 and not more than $5,000′ and inserting ‘$80,000 and not more than $200,000′; and

(3) in clause (iii), by striking ‘$3,000 and not more than $10,000′ and inserting ‘$120,000 and not more than $1,600,000′.

See the full text here.

.  .  .

We will keep a watchful eye on these legislative proposals and let you know if and when they are finalized. In the meantime, please contact us if you have any questions about how the proposed changes could impact your business.

This entry was posted in In the News, Our Blog. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed. Please contact us